Fifty Ways To Leave Your Clutter: Part Five

Laney Watson 4th grade Kid's artThis week we're finishing up our series by Rita Emmett; 50 Ways to Leave Your Clutter. Here are Part One, Part Two, Part Three, and Part Four in case you missed them.

~~ That Could Be Art, Bart ~~
41. Make keepsake albums for kids with a 3-ring binder. Include pictures, certificates, cards or letters, and add your own comments. Children can keep this in their rooms and will come to treasure the memories you are providing. Read more

Fifty Ways To Leave Your Clutter: Part Four

family heirloomsThis week we have part four of Rita Emmett's post; 50 Ways to Leave Your Clutter. Here are Part One, Part Two, and Part Three, in case you missed them.

~~ Make a Family Call, Paul ~~
For family heirlooms or photos that are just collecting dust, never being
used, and you don’t really want, but you can’t throw them out:
33. Contact everyone in the family and tell them you don’t use or want these family heirlooms and ask if anyone wants them Read more

Fifty Ways To Leave Your Clutter: Part Three

Fifty Ways To Leave Your Clutter: Part ThreeHere are Part One or Part Two, in case you missed them.

~~ Just Give It Away, Ray ~~
Here you won’t get a tax deduction, but you’ll have the satisfaction of helping someone and expecting nothing in return. Plus good things will come back to you. Here’s a poem quoted by Joe Vitale in The Greatest Money-Making Secret in History:
A man there was, and they called him mad, The more he gave, the more he had. Read more

Fifty Ways To Leave Your Clutter: Part One

Fifty Ways To Leave Your Clutter: Part OneTime to date myself here – Do you remember the 1975 Paul Simon hit, 50 Ways to Leave Your Lover? Well, Rita has come up with a clever de-clutter version: Fifty Ways To Leave Your Clutter!

Here are the first 10 – Check back in the weeks ahead for more!

~~ Take Time To Decide, Clyde ~~
The first step in leaving your clutter, before you even touch one things, is:
1. Decide where you’re stuff is going to, whether you want to donate it or sell it; how and where you will do that. Read more

Time To Conquer Perfectionism

imperfectionCan you name 3 of the top New Year's Resolutions that people make every January?
Do you know what my 3 topics are?? AHA! How perceptive of you. That's right. The answers to both questions are the same.

My topics are (and my passion is) helping people to 1) break the procrastination habit, 2) conquer clutter and 3) manage stress in a healthy way.

Would you believe that there is one specific habit/attitude that has such a profound impact on ALL of these topics that all three of my books devote a large chunk of space to it? Got any idea what attitude would increase your clutter AND procrastination AND stress? Go ahead. Try to guess. Read more

Tackling Photo Clutter

photo casesAre you saving photos of people you don't know so you can pass them on to your kids…who also don't know them?Are you keeping photos of places or events you have no clue about, so you can pass them on to family or friends…who also don't have a clue?

Important Thought #1: OK, let's start here. You are telling yourself that these old photos of people you don't know are very important.
No, they are not. They are people you don't know. NOBODY values those photos. Do you know why?

BECAUSE THEY DON'T KNOW THE PEOPLE. Read more

A Legacy of "Stuff" (Part 4)

rusty screwsIn the previous 3 blog posts (Part 1, Part 2 & Part 3), I wrote about what to do with the stuff of loved ones who have passed away, and how important it is to communicate with your friends and family about the stuff that YOU might leave behind.

So the questions to start with is: what you are leaving behind and why the heck are you hanging on to that? Read more

A Legacy of "Stuff" (Part 3)

bowlIn A Legacy of "Stuff" (part 1) and A Legacy of "Stuff" (part 2), we discussed what to do with the "stuff" left behind by someone who passed away. It was hard to write and hard for you to read. Now let's move into an even MORE difficult area — the stuff that WE will leave behind. (By the way, I can't find any material already written on this subject. Apparently, everyone else also thinks it's hard to write about.)If you plan to leave something to the next generation or to your friends, do some very good communicating with them now to see if they would want it. If not, realize that your cherished items might be more burden than bounty to people you love. Most of all, let them know what is important or valuable, so they don’t decide everything you own is clutter, and toss it out. Read more

A Legacy of "Stuff" (Part 2)

A Legacy of This week we continue with the difficult subject of being overwhelmed with the "stuff" left behind by a loved one who has passed away.

(You can read Part 1 here.)

The struggle is that we are trying to find practical ways to survive having someone's lifetime-of-stuff joining our own lifetime-of-stuff, while also trying to survive all the emotions that come with this deep painful loss.

Based on the huge number of emails I received after Part 1, last weeks post resonated with many of you. One woman told the story of how for seven years, all of her parents' belongings were stacked to the ceiling in her basement – furniture, clothes, stuff. So much so that they could not even make a path through it all. Read more

A Legacy of "Stuff" (Part 1)

sadEmails arrive so often describing how — in addition to all the heart-rending emotions of a death — there is the overwhelmed experience of not knowing what to do about all the "stuff" of a beloved person who has passed away.

One woman wrote that her usually uncluttered home is filled with all the items she cleared out from her mother's house after her mom died. She said she often bursts into tears seeing paths through this new clutter in her house yet she doesn't know what to do with any of it. She was clear that she did not want or need the stuff but she knew these were things her mother loved Read more

21 Tips to Create Clutter-Busting Kids

Toy ShelfHere are 21 tips to help kids become clutter-busters. (and a lot are helpful to adults, too.)

1. Cleaning their rooms involves making decisions. The more you help to simplify the room, the easier the cleaning and the decision-making becomes.

2. Check out books from the library, and buy only the ones your children really love. Why spend money on books they’ll never read?

3. If toys, books, puzzles and games don’t have a happy home that the child can reach easily to put away, then, you’ve got clutter. Read more

Spring Cleaning Tips From Rita Emmett

declutterHappy Spring (cleaning) time!! Are you ready to start your clutter-busting journey but don't know how to begin?

When I first started, I knew I didn't have the discipline or organizational skills to get rid of my stuff, so I asked my clutter-free friends for help. (You don't want to ask your totally cluttered friends for help because they will just tell you to keep everything, right?) Different friends helped in different ways. Read more

Crystallize Your Goals with a Vision Board

vision-boardA friend recently told me that his goal has been to get a car better than his old beat-up clunker that needs new brakes.

Last week, his brother gave him a car FOR FREE. It is one year newer than the clunker, has working brakes, but looks like a rust-bucket.

Instead of feeling happy, my friend is cranky. I asked him what kind of car was his goal? He said, "Anything but this one."

When your goal is "anything" that's what you get. Read more

7 Holiday Anti-Stress Tips

holiday-stressHere are 7 Tips to help you ease your stress and get ready for the holidays without having a major anxiety attack:

1. Write a list of everything you need to do for the holidays. Make it a general list. For example: Don't list what you'll get for each person, just write "buy gifts".

2. Next – go through your list, eliminate anything you don't HAVE to do, & rearrange it in order of what needs to be done first. Then hang up your list where you'll see it. Read more

When Gifts Become Clutter

oh-you-shouldnt-haveIf you are surrounded by stuff, especially stuff you don't need or use (sometimes referred to as "clutter"), start with figuring out how it comes into your life. Can you put a boundary on it?

We're not just talking about putting limits on charge cards or waiting three days before making a purchase. To stop the flow of clutter into your life calls for some serious creative problem solving. Read more

Sure Fire Ways to Eliminate Paper Clutter: 11 Excellent Tips

paper-clutterExcerpt from the CLUTTER BUSTING chapter of The Procrastinator’s Handbook by Rita Emmett

Look around at all the paper in your life. Are you keeping up with all the reading material that gravitates toward you?

Do you have stacks of papers, memos, professional journals, newsletters, magazines, catalogs, and junk mail growing at work or in your house? Do you fear that future generations of children may not know what trees look like because they are all being cut down and turned into paper (the trees, not the children) and being stuffed into your mailbox or splattered across your desk?

Do you start off tackling your paper clutter with determination, and eventually wind up whimpering in a corner curled up in a fetal position? Read more

21 Tips to Help Kids Become Clutter-Busters

kids-organizingThese tips can help adults, too!

1. Cleaning their rooms involves making decisions. The more you help to simplify the room, the easier the cleaning and the decision-making becomes.

2. Check out books from the library, and buy only the ones your children really love. Why spend money on books they’ll never read?

3. If toys, books, puzzles and games don’t have a happy home that the child can reach easily to put away, then, you’ve got clutter.

4. Help them get drawers and the closet to a state where they can easily fit their clothes and other belongings into them without pushing or shoving. Read more