Declutter Kitchen Instantly by Tossing These 8 Items

declutter-kitchen-toss-8-things

Tossing duplicate and worn pans and utensils is an excellent way to declutter your kitchen – plus it paves the road to kitchen organization. Kitchen organizing, while a challenge, starts with the difficult process of letting go. Most of what we have, we do not use, and this is true of clothing, kitchen accessories and most other possessions. Here is a list of common things you most likely need to toss to help declutter your kitchen quickly and efficiently. Sometimes we want to sell you things; today we want you to just let go.

1. Duplicate Utensils

You don’t need three spatulas, two slotted spoons and four ladles. Determine what you need and don’t need and give them away or donate them. Utensils takes up tons of storage in your drawers and on your counter. Someone else will be happy to have your discarded ones.

2. Ragged Towels and Dish Cloths

Know when it’s time to let go. Your clean new ones will bring you joy when you see them hanging from the towel bar.

3. Extra Coffee Cups

You saved them because they were gifts, or because you felt guilty. But do you really have to? No. Unload them on your coworkers (don’t tell Marie Kondo) or give them to the Goodwill. Think of all the inches you reclaimed in your cupboard.

4. Extra Drink Containers or Water Bottles

They find their way to the back of the cupboard. You can’t find them. You purchase more. Yes, you must stay hydrated. No, you don’t need all of those extra bottles. You are one person, not a camel – okay, maybe four, including kids, but those bottles are just hogging space in your cupboards. Make sure to check under the car seat too. You’re sure to find more, plus things you might need.

5. Worn Anodized Pans

Toxic, ugly, are you really eating those flaky bits? Use the excuse that they are worn to finally let them go. You’ll feel safer and you won’t regret it. Feel free to toss the duplicate ones too and be glad for the 100 plus cubic inches of space you now have. Pat yourself on the back. Breathe. It’s a good day.

6. Chipped and Cracked Dishes and Glasses

They’re chipped. They’re cracked. They might cut your mouth, or someone else’s. You feel sad every time you see the damage and remember the careless thing you did to break it. It was once shiny and new. Now it’s not. Why keep the negative reminder? You have other ones that are perfect.

7. Expired Canned Goods and Other Food

Think of a reason you need to keep these. No, don’t. Compost pile or trash. Now, please, thank you. You rock.

8. Orphaned Plastic Lids or Storage Containers

You will never find them, so just let go. They are off with the socks somewhere, also never to be found. But rest assured – they are happy, wherever they are, and they’re not alone – they’re keeping the socks company.

Make yourself a nice meal now with your newly spacious kitchen. Or just enjoy a warm cuppa and congratulate yourself. You’re on the right track to decluttering your kitchen. You did it! You let things go. Enjoy your splendid emptiness.

Love,

Clutter Control Freak


You might also enjoy this kitchen cleaning for single people blog post on Organizeit.com.

Thanksgiving recipes: Use a ricer for the best mashed potatoes

Yes, the turkey is the star of the Thanksgiving Day dinner, but there are many key players. My favorite every year is the creamy, buttery mashed potatoes — no one can make them like my mother. This year, I finally asked: what’s the secret?

Using a ricer instead of whipping or hand mashing potatoes creates smooth, lump-free spuds fit for melted butter, gravy or both. Cook’s Illustrated recently put a few model to the test and picked two models on our site as their top two favorites.

  • RSVP International Potato Ricer: This food press features a sturdy handle and pot hook so it stays in place while you process your potatoes. The rectangular shape makes it easy to fit spuds of all sizes, plus the interchangeable disks allow you to master a range of different textures. It’s also a great model for making your own baby food or removing extra moisture from cooked greens. Plus, it’s dis-mountable and dishwasher safe!
    Cleaning: ∗∗∗  Ease of Use: ∗∗∗  Performance: ∗∗∗
  • OXO Three in One Adjustable Potato Ricer: This ricer from OXO is made for more than one job. The adjustable grates are great for ricing potatoes, but can also be used to cube veggies for soups and other recipes. This model also features a pot hook so it can be rested on the side of your pan while you process potatoes. Made from stainless steel and BPA-free plastic, plus it is safe to use in the dishwasher.
    Cleaning: ∗∗∗  Ease of Use: ∗∗1/2  Performance: ∗∗∗

Tips for the best mashed potatoes:

  • Season the cooking water: potatoes can be bland and the best way to season them is to salt the water you cook them in.
  • Get butter and cream warm before adding: Using cold cream or butter can cause potatoes to get gummy. Heat up the butter and cream beforehand.
  • Infuse: Steep crushed garlic and your favorite herbs in your warm butter before adding to your potatoes. This way you get flavor without lumps or chunks.
  • Use a ricer: Obviously, using a ricer will give you the smoothest potatoes, but make sure you do it while the spuds are still hot.

How To Leave Work Earlier

outlookI have recently moved my office into my home. I’m actually enjoying the integration of “home” and “work” life. It’s not the distraction that I thought it would be. As a matter of fact, my biggest problem is working too long and late into the evening.

Today I received an email from Marcia Francois – to my rescue again!

Try these suggestions for organizing your day and not over-working yourself: Read more

A Legacy of “Stuff” (Part 4)

rusty screwsIn the previous 3 blog posts (Part 1, Part 2 & Part 3), I wrote about what to do with the stuff of loved ones who have passed away, and how important it is to communicate with your friends and family about the stuff that YOU might leave behind.

So the questions to start with is: what you are leaving behind and why the heck are you hanging on to that? Read more

What to do when it all gets too much…

too muchI get so many emails from people telling me that it all just gets so overwhelming they don’t know where to start.One day everything is okay and the next it seems as if the paper is all over the place, they can’t find what they need on their computer, they have thousands of emails in their inbox and they’re paralyzed with overwhelm.

They can’t even get to urgent tasks, let alone the important ones that will help them reach their goals.

This is what I suggest: Read more

A Legacy of “Stuff” (Part 3)

bowlIn A Legacy of “Stuff” (part 1) and A Legacy of “Stuff” (part 2), we discussed what to do with the “stuff” left behind by someone who passed away. It was hard to write and hard for you to read. Now let’s move into an even MORE difficult area — the stuff that WE will leave behind. (By the way, I can’t find any material already written on this subject. Apparently, everyone else also thinks it’s hard to write about.)If you plan to leave something to the next generation or to your friends, do some very good communicating with them now to see if they would want it. If not, realize that your cherished items might be more burden than bounty to people you love. Most of all, let them know what is important or valuable, so they don’t decide everything you own is clutter, and toss it out. Read more

7 secrets of the Super Organized

PlannerWe all know people that seem to be Super Organised. They never forget birthdays, can find an email within seconds and know exactly where to find anything in their homes.The actual definition of organized is being able to find anything within a minute or two. These are items in your home to an email, document or photo on your computer.

Shhhh – I have a confession. Some people say this about me too, so I’m going to let you in on some of my own secrets and also those I’ve observed from watching fellow Born Organized people. Read more

A Legacy of “Stuff” (Part 2)

A Legacy of This week we continue with the difficult subject of being overwhelmed with the “stuff” left behind by a loved one who has passed away.

(You can read Part 1 here.)

The struggle is that we are trying to find practical ways to survive having someone’s lifetime-of-stuff joining our own lifetime-of-stuff, while also trying to survive all the emotions that come with this deep painful loss.

Based on the huge number of emails I received after Part 1, last weeks post resonated with many of you. One woman told the story of how for seven years, all of her parents’ belongings were stacked to the ceiling in her basement – furniture, clothes, stuff. So much so that they could not even make a path through it all. Read more